It's right here in the opening sentence of his piece in the New York Times: The Senate recently passed a bill intended to bolster America’s technological and industrial capacity as we compete against China. America doesn't compete, on any rational economic basis, with China. People who are Americans, companies that are or might be, do indeed compete with people who are Chinese and or with companies that are Chinese to some extent or other. They also cooperate with each other too. People and certain types of organisation might well compete - nations are not one of those organisations that does compete economically. This is just the same sa the statement that nations don;t trade with each other, economic actors do. Which is why national restrictions upon trade aren't really the thing to be doing. Because if nations don't trade with each other then how can national restrictions upon who you can trade with be rational? Yes, of course, we can use shorthands like USA Inc and Germany GmbH but they are shorthands, they are proxies. And as ever with using a proxy it's important to understand when it's a useful shorthand for the thing not directly observable and when it isn't. Trade and nations ain't. But in one of those “only in Washington” moments, a bill written to make our country more competitive with China now includes an amendment that will do exactly the opposite. We're not trying to make the nation competitive. At most we might desire to make certain economic...
There's a long way to go on this but this is indeed a start: The U.K. government said it will scrap a piece of planned red tape on wine imports. a move it said would save 10 pence ($0.14) on each bottle imported into Britain. Hey, 10 p is 10 p, right? The British government is also scrapping VI-1 certificates for wine imports from non-EU countries including Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. Combined with the EU measure, the decision will save wine importers about 100 million pounds annually, according to the WSTA. Lots of 10ps. Actually, lots and lots: Officials estimate the saving for consumers at £130m, while the industry believes it will save £100m on non-EU wines and avoid imposing costs of £70m on those from the continent. As to what is really happening. In order to stop those damned colonials out three shipping their nice and lovely wine into the European Union...
Whether it's just a few or the many still remains to be worked out but there are definitely those at the Post Office who should be slung into jail: The Post Office computer flaw that meant hundreds of postmasters were wrongly convicted of crimes they did not commit could cost the taxpayer £233 million as the Government sets aside funds for payouts. The Government has disclosed in its accounts that it is setting aside the money for compensation for those accused of theft and false accounting in 1999 and 2000. The government is having to provide the money because the Post Office - no, no the mail - is a government owned firm. As to what actually happened, in a nutshell: Fujitsu shouldn’t be off the hook for the system either. From what I’ve read it seems the system didn’t implement one of the crucial features of a database – an update should...
Apparently, so we're told, crime is soaring in the United States. But that's OK, we know the reason why. We even know what to do about it. Just take all he money of the rich bastards and crime will fall again. A friend is trying to sell his condo in downtown Portland but large parts of downtown have been turned into a giant homeless camp so there are few buyers even in this hot real estate market. The nearby streets are pockmarked with tents and the curbs frequently sport human waste. It's possible that this is something to do with the way that Portland is being governed but then hey, what do we know? This isn't to romanticize poverty; it's tough, and crime is a problem in barrios and slums around the world. But crime isn't sweeping the cities of Europe, Japan, South Korea or Taiwan the way it is American...
It's important - actually, vital in both meanings here - to know what is being measured and how in order to understand what the measurement is telling us. This being a point that is being dismally ignored here. Covid hasn't reduced American life expectancy in the slightest. It has reduced the lifespan of many Americans - these two are not the same thing. U.S. Life Expectancy Fell By 1.5 Years In 2020, The Biggest Drop Since WWII Nope, age at death fell. U.S. life expectancy fell by a year and a half in 2020, the largest one-year decline since World War II, public health officials said Wednesday. The decrease for both Black Americans and Hispanic Americans was even worse: three years. The drop spelled out by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is due mainly to the COVID-19 pandemic, which health officials said is responsible for close to 74% of...

expunct

in British English
expunct (ɪkˈspʌŋkt)
VERB (transitive)
1. to delete or erase; blot out; obliterate
2. to wipe out or destroy

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